November 9, 2015

Feng Shui in New York City: the Year of the Fire Monkey begins

I love the energy of New York City.

Last week, I was in NYC along with many of my peers for the Joey Yap Feng Shui and Astrology Updates Seminar for 2016.

It’s a very Yang city from a Feng Shui perspective, and always has a lot going on. (Yang represents things that are masculine, bright, hot, strong, violent, overt, exterior, and aggressive)

NYC has always been such a dynamic city for me to visit and this time was particularly fun with a group of us going out on Halloween.

My Feng Shui colleagues and I were there to learn what the energies of the upcoming Fire Monkey Year potentially hold.

Learning about the potential energies of the year ahead is vital for those of us who know the insight Feng Shui offers in manifesting one’s destiny.

The reason we study Chinese Astrology is to give us better optics to see what’s coming, which in turn gives us better options for making our decisions. When you know the probabilities of what’s coming you can adjust your actions.

A good life is always a result of better options which results in better decisions.

I will write a longer blog in the future on the upcoming Fire Monkey Year, but for now, let me share with you that it looks like it will be worldwide a dramatic and disruptive year.

Fire and Metal are the predominant elements of the Year and they are not in balance; implying conflict, explosions, and disruption both for peace and money markets. While in every year there are always opportunities, for the upcoming year it is wise to be prudent with expansion and investments.

There is so much to share about what I learned in NYC.

And it’s extremely interesting to compare the Feng shui of my hometown Vancouver to that of New York City,

Where Vancouver has Mountain Dragons, Manhattan has Flatland Water Dragons.

Water Dragons are a very different QI, it moves quickly, is associated with money, and finance – just like New York.

Central Park is the point where all the Qi collects, no surprise either that some of the world’s most expensive apartments overlook the park – perfectly positioned between water and earth.

I’ll end my blog today with a great lesson explaining dragons in more details.

Flatland Dragons: Concept and Theory of Dragons in Feng Shui by Moon L Chin.

There are Dragons everywhere in every part of the World.

What are these Dragons as described in Feng Shui? Dragons are nothing but the highs and lows of earth’s landscape. Highlands are called Mountain Dragons, lowlands are called Flatland Dragons, and both are classified as Earth or Land Dragons. Streams and rivers are called Water Dragons.

The Dragons in China might not be the same as the ones in other parts of the world, but the Theory and Concept in identifying these Dragons are the same. There is only one set of Theory and only one Concept concerning the identification of Dragons and all its characteristics. But there are varying kinds of formulas in the different schools of Feng Shui in analyzing the auspiciousness or inauspiciousness that these Dragons can bring to a certain place, grave or residence.

Why chose the word Dragon to depict these geographical phenomena? Feng Shui is part of Chinese Metaphysics, which in turn is an inseparable and essential component of Chinese Culture and Philosophy.

Chinese writing is a pictorial language, which reflects the mentality of the Chinese towards Nature and the Universe. This reflection reveals the vividness of Chinese imagination and thought patterns.

When the forefathers of Chinese Metaphysics discovered all those wonderful theories and concepts and kept records of these discoveries, they naturally depicted them in the most vivid way. When they discovered the intrinsic essence that lies within the earth what we now call Qi, and how this Qi is party to the formation of the twisting and winding landscape, they vividly linked that to the celestial and mythical animal called the Dragon. The Dragon, according to the generally accepted concept and as described in legend, also twists and winds when it moves, much like a snake. Therefore winding highlands and rivers are depicted as Dragons.

As described earlier there are Earth and Water Dragons and each has its own function within the scheme of Universal evolvement. There are two types of Earth Dragons: Highland Dragons and Flatland Dragons.

It is easy to understand what Highland Dragon are and how they look like due to its high visibility, but for Flatland Dragons it is not so easy to identify due to its lowness or flatness. The fact is the Flatland Dragon is not flat at all but is made up of many small tiny Dragons on Earth, all about the same height. This theory can be referred to in the Zang Shu or Book of Burial.

There is a popular saying within Feng Shui circles that: ‘One inch higher is mountain’. This is quite true.

Hence, Flatland also has Dragons. Therefore when working on a Feng Shui analysis on properties on Flatland, the ability to identify the twisting and windings of a Dragon will depend on how skillful the Master is.

In the case of Water Dragons, it is naturally and absolutely impossible not to be able to identify. Water Dragons are streams and rivers. How are these Water Dragons formed? They are formed in the lowest part between two high grounds such as vales, valleys, and ravines. They also twist and wind their way around hills and mountains.

What is the relationship between Qi, Earth Dragons, and Water Dragons? The relationship is one of Mother and Child. Why Mother and Child? The reason can be found in the Zang Shu (Book of Burial). It says that: “Earth produces Qi and Qi produces Water”.

As Qi moves, Earth moves, it becomes the Earth Dragon. As Qi produces Water, it becomes the Water Dragon.

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