Limited Time Offer: 50% OFF Marlyna's book "Do You See What I See?" with coupon code "Love+Light"
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The Truth About Stairs

Stairs are a big deal in Feng Shui as they move and distribute Qi. A carefully planned Feng Shui home is one where the stairs are built correctly and located in an area where they can receive positive Qi and distribute it in a positive way.
What does that mean?  In Classical Feng Shui, analysis is done using concepts of Forms and Formula.  Forms are the tangible aspect of what you actually see (shapes, motion, size) and Formula is derived with compass directions and time (intangible, but none the less extremely powerful aspects of magnetic and seasonal Qi).  You may not be able to see the energy of Spring versus Summer, but you can certainly see the effect it has in the garden.  With Flying Stars and Eight Mansions formula, it is possible to determine what kind of Qi each compass sector contains.  When building and designing a new home we use formula to determine the best location to build the stairs.
Here are a few basic principles:

  • The ‘Form’ of the stairs should be well lit, not squeezed, gently curving, and ideally have wide landings. We want the Qi to move in an even and gentle manner.  A large staircase with a couple of broad landings is perfect to regulate the Qi flow.
  • The Tai Ji of a property, also known as the centre heart of the house, must be kept stable and peaceful.   Avoid a home with stairs in the middle of the property. When the heart and Qi of the house is disturbed, people are anxious and irritable.
  • The Staircase should not face the front door.  That sentence has confused a lot of people.  To be precise when this is a problem is if the bottom landing of the stairs is facing directly across the front door within a 3-5 foot space. Qi flows in a downward motion (just like water) so the problem with stairs too close and facing the front door is energy is literally being pushed out the door. The effect correlates to problems with building assets or holding onto money.  Mitigate this effect with a large landing or foyer. Joey Yap, my teacher in Malaysia, said to me once that the size of the landing inside and outside the main door (in Feng Shui we call it the Ming Tang or Bright Hall) has a direct impact on the power and influence of the occupant. I have found this to be true.
  • The staircase should not lead directly to any room unless it is used as a storeroom. A room directly at the bottom of the stairs will usually be affected by disturbed and volatile Qi.
  • It is essential that there be a landing before the staircase opens onto the Master bedroom. If there is a landing, then there is a small bright hall and the Qi has an opportunity to collect before it gently moves into the master bedroom.

If you want to learn more about interior form, I will be discussing the major myths and truths at my upcoming webinar called Feng Shui for Homes. Register online.
Image © flickr.com/Rob Pongsajapan

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